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Culture in Koshigaya

Traditional costumes

Most Japanese people wear western clothing nowadays. The kimono however, is still popular as formal wear. A kimono is often worn for special occasions such as New Year holiday, coming of age, college graduation parties, weddings and funerals.

Greetings and gestures

The traditional Japanese greeting is not shaking hands, but bowing from the waist. This is called Ojigi, and is a means of expressing respect and affection. It can be used when saying good morning, hello, thank you and goodbye.

The degree of inclination, from slight to very low, depends on the relationship between the people involved and the situation in which bows are exchanged. Touching or hugging someone in public is considered impolite.

When visiting another person’s home, it is customary for Japanese people to take the host a gift.

Daruma doll

The Koshigaya Daruma doll originated from the image of Bodhidarma sitting in meditation, which was painted on a tumbler doll (Okiagari-koboshi) in the middle of the Edo period. Since then, it has been popular as a charm for good luck and to ward off bad luck.

Hina doll

In Koshigaya, the Japanese doll ‘Koshigaya Hina Ningyo’ has been produced since the Edo period. Koshigaya has been promoting the production of the doll for more than 230 years by keeping up the traditional skills to make them.

Rice cracker

The tasty rice cracker (Koshigaya Teyaki Senbel) was sold at a tea house on the main road ‘Oshu-kaido’ in the Edo period, and it gradually became a popular snack in Koshigaya. Koshigaya was famous for producing the high-quality rice used in the cracker.

Minami - Koshigaya Awaodori Dance Festival

Awaodori is a 400 year old tradition which originated from Tokushima Prefecture. The dance festival is one of many which showcase not only the cultural aspect, but the willingness of its people to keep alive such a tradition.

Many groups do a variety of dances to a distinctive Awaodori rhythm played with traditional Japanese drums, bamboo flutes and gongs.

 
 

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