You may want to upgrade your browser. We have detected you are using Internet Explorer 10 or earlier. It is recommended that you update your browser to the latest version to get a better user experience. Find out more

Your JavaScript is disabled, we suggest you enable it to improve your Council website user experience.
Site wide emergency announcement. Site wide alert announcement. Site wide alert resolved. Latest Council update regarding COVID-19.
Site wide emergency announcement. Site wide alert announcement. Site wide alert resolved. Our administration offices and some services will be closed on Tuesday 26 January and will reopen on Wednesday 27 January 2021. Find out more about changes to our operating hours for the Australia Day public holiday.
Skip to main content Menu
Main Content Anchor

Aboriginal history of koalas

Garilwa -The word ‘koala’ is thought to have come from an Aboriginal word meaning ‘no drink’ because koalas obtain most of the moisture they need from gum leaves.

Koalas, like all Australian native animals, are an important part of Aboriginal culture and feature in many of their myths and legends and are recognised as a totem species. There are many varied and rich legends about koalas and the symbolisms attached to them and many of these are maintained through traditional Aboriginal dreamtime stories.

D’harawal Dreaming Stories by Aunty Frances Bodkin tells stories of the D’harawal People and Gawaian Bodkin-Andrews, of which she is the traditional knowledge holder. These ancient dreaming stories feature ‘Kuwala’ora the Koala People’ and can be purchased at the Campbelltown Visitor Information Centre or viewed at www.dharwalstories.com

MelanieHava.JPG

Back to top Back to top